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I. Elber. Montclair State University. 2019.

Is it legal to place children in there for long periods? Pam Wright: Short answer is that school districts are being sued over this generic cialis soft 20mg fast delivery erectile dysfunction viagra doesn't work. I think they are abominable and there have been a flurry of $$$$ dollar damage lawsuits because of them? Pete Wright: Read some of the cases and get some community organization and a lawsuit going order 20mg cialis soft erectile dysfunction treatment kerala. Pam Wright: The Witte case in Nevada and a recent case in KY or TN. Pete Wright: There are often very strict state standards for that type of placement in a state mental hospital. If child has a behavior problem, needs to have a functional behavior assessment per IDEA. David: Here are some additional responses from the audience to my question about how to deal successfully with the school system. I met with them even before my child entered first day of class to let them know I was an involved parent, interested in building a team approach. I was trained and continue to use verbal de-escalation and have not used restraint. I am overwhelmed by the frequent application and intensity of hands before words. This is very disturbing personally and professionally. Pam Wright: We are getting many questions from special education teachers about things like this, too many children in classes. Can you get help from CEC or a special ed or education group? Pete Wright: I am amazed by the use of physical force. Pam Wright: Who can teachers turn to when asked to do things that are illegal or immoral or just plain wrong? Pete Wright: I worked several years in a juvenile training school as a houseparent and we did not have to use force with rapists, killers, very disturbed children. It was me and 20-25 of them, locked in a cottage ward, or sometimes in an unlocked cottage ward. It seems that some schools are gravitating toward almost a sadistic cruel way of working with children that they do not understand. Pam Wright: I think special ed teachers are going to have to take a stand against this. Pete Wright: But the question is, what is your recourse? All I can offer is for you to see if you can get literature and perhaps try to set up some training programs for staff and administrators regarding behavior control without use of force and timeout locked closets. It is done out there and the alternative may be a very large $$$ damage lawsuit. That fear of litigation can be a powerful motivator to change behavior when all else fails. Shar: I cannot get the CSE Committee to understand the relationship between NVLD and anxiety and that children with learning disabilities can achieve excellent grades while overcompensating. Any suggestions with limited resources in rural USA? Pam Wright: If you are on a special education teacher list, you may get some help from others. You will need to get a psychologist or evaluator to write recommendations as to what child needs. As a parent, you have little or no credibility when you are dealing with school people so you need someone else to make the recommendations. Pete Wright: You are a parent, they will not hear you. Have someone else, private sector psych or whatever, be the lightning rod and catalyst for change. Have that person write a letter and send material and advise that they will do a follow up call to see if the info is helpful, for starters. Julie C: Under the Special Education laws, are children with learning disabilities entitled to a tutor paid at the school districts expense if the child is in need of more educational instruction? Pete Wright: Nothing prohibits payment of private tutor, except tradition, policies, never done it before, this is the way we always do it, and other such reasons. Pam Wright: Some public school supervisors will believe you have insulted their staff, who are of course, the best! Pam Wright: Again, you are getting an outside person to be the lightening rod. Pete Wright: Meds - follow up, ritatin and dex, etc, I have taken them from time-to-time and found them helpful, was on dexedrine during middle school years. Pam Wright: You request to receive proposals before the IEP meeting? The reality is that people are pulling stuff together at the last minute. So yes, you should be able to ask but they may not be able to provide what you want. David: One thing I also want to ask and I think this is a legitimate concern among many parents. They may or may not stand up for their child because they are afraid of being a "lightening rod" for retaliation against their child by the teachers or administrators. Can you elaborate on that a bit and make some positive suggestions on how best to deal with this train of thought? Pam Wright: First, develop a businesslike relationship. One of the participants talked about meeting people before her child started school. But you will always be somewhat afraid because this is YOUR child. Pete Wright: Parents often generate staff anger toward them because staff views them as not being appreciative of their efforts. Parents have anger toward staff because they see child falling further-and-further behind. Parent must become more professional than the staff, aka Ms. Manners, with thank you letters that are later evidence if necessary.

I think that I learned a lot in every program I was in buy cialis soft with paypal erectile dysfunction age 32. The last program I was in lasted about 9 months and that was the true beginning point for me order 20mg cialis soft amex erectile dysfunction protocol amazon. After my discharge from the program, I worked on my own, very hard I have to add, for about another 5 months and each day symptoms and fears lessened. I remember leaving the program the day before Thanksgiving. Two days after Thanksgiving was the last day I purged or starved. And those definitions of recovery were not what I wanted for myself. Your inner power is most amazing once you tap into it and follow it. Bob M: Here are other similar comments, then a question:Tammy: Monika, do you think that complete recovery is possible? Ack: That is all I have ever heard, that you will always have it. Dbean: Do you struggle with going back and forth between wanting to get better and wanting to keep the eating disorder? Monika Ostroff: To respond to the first question: I do honestly believe that complete recovery is possible. Getting there requires some very hard work, a lot of introspection, asking some really tough questions and then going out and really digging for the answers. It is almost invariably connected to discovering and validating your self-worth. Going back and forth between an eating disorder and getting better happened in the beginning and in the middle of my recovery. I think that ambivalence is a normal part of recovery. After all, look at all the important things eating disorders can do do for you. They protect you, communicate for you, manage your feelings. The thought of living without one is scary at first. But new ships, I have found, can sail a whole lot better than old ones. You learn to make connections, to fill the space your eating disorder filled with people. I think we all deserve the life-affirming connections of healthy relationships. Those relationships can only exist and unfold when we stop befriending anorexia and bulimia and make them move aside. Bob M: Earlier you mentioned that you attended several treatment programs. Monika Ostroff: Four-and-a-half years, perhaps five, since the start of the first program to the recovered point. I know that there was one year in particular when I was only home for a total of 2 weeks. I was searching for the answer and I was pretty determined to keep searching until I found it... Bob M: Just to clarify here, are you saying you went from one eating disorder treatment program to another in search of the right one for you? Or was it that you were able to control your eating disordered behaviors for awhile and then you relapsed? After my first admission, I managed to stay out from July to February, then I went in for a month. Then I was discharged and stayed home until June and then I was inpatient literally all summer. Particularly the year I was just plain old "in the hospital. I took me that long to figure out that what I really needed was gentleness and compassion. It took me a long time to dare to say that I wanted to search for the shreds of worth within me and work towards a healthier life for myself. It took me that long to figure out that to get better I had to like and love myself as much as I liked and loved my friends. To do that I had to learn to listen to and heed the voice in my heart while developing my own authentic voice to express my needs, desires, pain, and dreams. There is a lot of searching within yourself, a lot of questions to be asked and answered. It took me some time to figure out that sometimes not having an answer was an answer in and of itself. I started considering that perhaps I was not all that different, perhaps I did deserve something, perhaps bad things had happened to me by chance and not because I deserved them. That is an important part and you need people who care about you to be there throughout the recovery process. And, as many of our previous guests have said, you may have relapses along the way. Deal with them early and work hard to move past them. We have some audience questions focusing on the medical aspects of your eating disorder Monika:Gage: I am an older woman and have been suffering with anorexia for years. I do not want to die, but I also feel I cannot win this fight. Will there be a warning when my heart has had enough? Monika Ostroff: For some people there are warnings, but for many people there are no warnings at all. In that respect, eating disorders can be like playing Russian Roulette. Bob M: Gage, I want to add, we are not doctors, but many medical experts have appeared here and stated: you can simply drop dead from your eating disorder without much warning. Watch for shortness of breath, chest pain, heart palpitations, sudden sweating, nausea. When does that start to normalize and is there anything you can do to help alleviate it some? Monika Ostroff: I definitely experienced bloating and "expanding". My eating disorder gave me some long-lasting gastrointestinal motility problems which contributed to the bloat.